The Race for Texas’s Powerful Energy Regulator Is Heating Up

Jim Wright, a Republican seeking a seat on a board that regulates the Texas energy industry, knows the agency intimately.

He ought to. He’s paid it $181,000 in fines.

$69.​9B Renewable power investment worldwide in Q2 2020 76% Carbon-free net power in Brazil, most recent data

Tepic, MexicoMost polluted air today, in sensor range

50,​820 Million metric tons of greenhouse emissions, most recent annual data +0.​97° C Sep. 2020 increase in global temperature vs. 1900s average 0 6 5 4 3 2 0 3 2 1 0 9 0 5 4 3 2 1 .0 3 2 1 0 9 0 2 1 0 9 8 0 0 9 8 7 6 0 5 4 3 2 1 0 6 5 4 3 2 0 0 9 8 7 6 Parts per million CO2 in the atmosphere 0 5 4 3 2 1 ,0 7 6 5 4 3 0 5 4 3 2 1 0 3 2 1 0 9 Soccer pitches of forest lost this hour, most recent data

If Wright prevails on Nov. 3, he’ll join the three-member Railroad Commission of Texas with lawsuits hanging over his head from a 2014 business deal that went bad, ending with his accepting responsibility for more than 255 environmental violations at a waste recycling facility.

“People expected me to run from this situation,” Wright said in an interview. “But it’s one of the main reasons I’m running for the Railroad Commission.”

Texas hasn’t placed a Democrat on the panel for 26 years, but a victory for Wright is far from certain. His Democrat opponent, Chrysta Castañeda, has more campaign money at her disposal after a late surge in fund raising, and Texas has become competitive for her party in the closing stages of this election cycle following anRead Full Article