Urgent Android warning to millions of users after malicious apps found in Samsung app store

AN urgent Android warning has gone out to millions of users after malicious apps were detected in the Samsung app store.

The apps in question may request to access things like contacts, call logs, and the telephone, leaving users at risk.

The latest malware-infected apps found in Samsung's Galaxy Store were detected by Android Police and are apparently cloned versions of piracy app Showbox.

Some of the infected apps will reportedly trigger a warning from Google's Play Protect, however, some can apparently make it through.

Android Police's investigators found that the apps may "request more permissions than you’d expect, including access to contacts, call logs and the telephone."

The real Showbox app has reportedly come under fire as well due to its services.

The app can stream films and TV shows and has been accused of using illegal means to do so.

The actual Showbox app had been removed from apps stores or had service disrupted in the past.

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Samsung did not immediately return The Sun's request for comment about the malicious apps.

A WARNING ABOUT CONTACTS

The new warning comes after a tech expert warned both Android and iPhone users to purge their contact lists because of apps that may access the information.

Some apps access the phone numbers and email addresses we connect with and build webs of associations.

This may allow hackers, law enforcement or intelligence agencies to know your identity and those of your connections.

"If a law enforcement agency considers you a person of interest, they may discover that you use encrypted messaging apps such as Signal," Peter Gregory, senior director at security firm Cyber GRC, warned.

"While the agency will not be able to view the contents of your conversations, it will be able to see with whom you are conversing."

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